Met Gala 2017 Red Carpet: Everything Need

2017 May 1st New York’s Tripolitan Museum of Art opened its doors for the Met Gala. It is the annual invitation-only fundraiser to benefit the museum’s Costume Institute, and a launch party for the upcoming spring exhibition.  

It became a big deal because of the red carpet, all different fashion star’s dresses, and the celebrities that gets the invitation from the first place. Here is few thinks you need to know about fashion’s one of the most important party, Met Gala. 

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WHY IS IT SUCH A BIG DEAL?

It is the only curatorial department at the Met that has to finance its own activities and the gala is the biggest fundraiser. The benefit was not pegged to an exhibition from 1948 to 1971, and was held off-site at the Waldorf Astoria or the Rainbow Room. Former Vogue editor Diana Vreeland brought new glamor to the Costume Institute when she joined as a consultant in 1972. Vreeland curated some of the most ambitious and heavily publicized exhibitions in its history, and used the gala as an opportunity to inaugurate them.

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WHO GETS THE INVITATION?

Gala’s biggest names are A-list models, musicians and actors, though occasionally a megawatt outsider will get pulled into its orbit.  Filling the rest of the seats are brand representatives, emerging designers, and invited patrons happy to spend upwards of $30,000 for a ticket. But this hasn’t always been the case.

"Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garcons: Art Of The In-Between" Costume Institute Gala - Arrivals
NEW YORK, NY – MAY 01: Rihanna attends the “Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garcons: Art Of The In-Between” Costume Institute Gala at Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 1, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images)

WHAT IS THE EXHIBITION THIS YEAR?

This year’s exhibition is dedicated to 74-year-old Japanese designer Rei Kawakubo. 

One of fashion’s most revered creative visionaries, she founded the avant garde label like some boys in 1969, and was part of a cohort of radical Japanese designers to debut in Paris in the early 1980s.

For decades she’s served as a source of inspiration to creators across disciplines. In 2010, Edward Enniniful, the soon to be new editor of British Vogue, told another magazine “she proved that you could be an outsider and still be influential, that you could follow your instincts and still make a difference.” In the same issue, Bjork cited her as proof that “it is possible to be that brave, that it is possible to keep one’s integrity.”

Throughout her career, Kawakubo has striven to create new aesthetics, defying norms about what clothing and the body should look like.

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